The town also became home to Luma Mufleh, an American-educated Jordanian woman who founded a youth soccer team to help keep Clarkston’s boys off the streets. These boys named themselves "The Fugees." 

Outcasts United follows a pivotal season in the life of the Fugees, their families and their charismatic coach as they struggle to build new lives in a fading town overwhelmed by change. Theirs is a story about resilience, the power of one person to make a difference and the daunting challenge of creating community in a place where people seem to have little in common.
MALDEN READS
    One City, One Book
Luma Mufleh
Warren St. John
His first book, Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer: A Journey into the Heart of Fan Mania (2004), was named one of Sports Illustrated’s best books of the year, and ranked number one on The Chronicle of Higher Education''s list of the best books ever written about collegiate athletics. 

His second book, Outcasts United: An American Town, A Refugee Team, and One Woman''s Quest to Make a Difference was published in the U.S. in April 2009, and subsequently in the U.K.,  Netherlands, Germany, Italy, Japan and China.  
CRITICAL ACCLAIM
THEMES
AUTHOR'S INTERVIEW
WHERE 
TO GET THE BOOK
YOUTH BOOK
 SELECTIONS
Outcasts United is the story of a refugee soccer team, a remarkable woman coach and a small southern town turned upside down by the process of refugee resettlement.
In the 1990s, that town, Clarkston, Georgia, became a resettlement center for refugees from war zones in Liberia, Congo, Sudan, Iraq and Afghanistan.
Warren St. John has written for the New York Observer, The New Yorker, Wired and Slate, in addition to his work as a reporter for The New York Times. 
St. John frequently writes about the impact of technology on social behavior. 
About The Book
Why We Chose It
In 2005, he introduced the term "metrosexual" into widespread usage through a Times piece headlined "Metrosexuals Come Out."